Posts Tagged ‘ web development ’

An Unlikely Trail From Digital to Print

As today’s media landscape continues to evolve, media groups must remain ambitious. As CEO of Ballantine Communications, Inc., nestled in the outdoor mecca of Durango, Colorado, my team and I found a media void in a place where you would expect it to be thriving, so we decided to act.

The annual booming $646 billion outdoor industry continues to grow and its audience is eager to learn, and even more eager to travel for their recreation. Market studies detail that for every dollar spent on outdoor equipment, four more are spent on travel and related needs. It is a broad group, male and female, ages 20-50 and beyond with a variety of interests. And we know how to reach them.

Today, BCI is aiming to be a basecamp for major online and regional outdoor media projects. Our Adventure Pro brand, an online website and now a print magazine, begins with the greater Southwest itself, a landscape of mountains and deserts, canyons and plateaus filled with renowned athletes and everyday explorers alike. With Adventure Pro, we embrace the huge world of outdoor recreation in a voice that aims to inspire our audience.

Our flagship website also aims to set itself apart with a vast amount of video-driven content. AdventurePro.us is composed of feature stories, tips and educational segments on equipment, how-tos, as well as travel pieces including après activity. We introduce something, whether sport or place, and dive right into where to get started.

Our newest entry in support of digital content is Adventure Pro Magazine, which will not only be an extension of the website experience, but will also stand alone as an engaging outdoor periodical. It will serve to redirect readers to the website so they can continue their experience. For every feature in the magazine, there is an elaboration of that content online.

Widely distributed, 20,000 copies will hit Northern New Mexico, Southeastern Utah and all along Colorado’s Western Slope. The quarterly magazine will celebrate each season and its unique recreational opportunities. Our carriers will stock strategic and highly visible places – restaurants, shops, cafes and hotels – in destinations synonymous with adventure: Moab, Utah; Taos, New Mexico; Pagosa Springs, Durango, Telluride and Grand Junction, Colorado.

At BCI, a content and video production team, a sales and marketing team and development team all work together to produce and promote Adventure Pro. For the esoteric realm of outdoor adventure, we’ve recognized a crucial need for a high level of expertise and an alternative skillset, so we built a staff accordingly to reflect the assorted audience we attract.

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Editor Brandon Mathis comes with 25 years of extensive outdoor experience and training, and a history in news media and storytelling. Mathis has a keen understanding of the culture and is himself a prime example of our audience.

Today’s outdoor enthusiast isn’t just a hiker or just a skier. They are hikers aspiring to ski and trail runners aspiring to mountain bike. They love to research online and educate themselves, from the latest performance wear to the best place for a breakfast on their weekend getaway. They want a little of everything. To them it’s all a lifestyle, not a weekend hobby.

The audience we are pursuing understands the sports we cover but wants to feel they are learning more than the basics. Our goal is to give novices enough information to make decisions about pursuit, and intermediate to experts those tips and information to help them better enjoy their adventure. This content is driven to deliver to people who want the most out of their passion.

We are also partnering with core outdoor businesses that share and reflect our brand’s values. Our supporters are niche retailers, gear supply shops, trending dining and social establishments, craft breweries and professional guide services. In addition to traditional advertising, we offer product placement, native content and digital and print packages, expanding our supporters’ marketing strategies.

The advertisers have also helped in driving our decision to add a print component to our offerings. In discussions with the different advertisers, they pushed the case that print still had a place in the mix due to the various locations many of the audience would consume content. Coffee shops, brewpubs and remote locations all still had strong print consumers not to mention a limitation with internet access in many locations. Thus they believed print and digital working in concert continues to make sense.

Our online presence is evergreen, immediately available and device-responsive as AdventurePro.us updates several times every week with new content. Our social media outlets, like Facebook and Instagram, have a growing audience, and we are developing new ways to engage them, even repurposing viewer-submitted social media content onto the print platform, making our own audience part of the content itself.

There is incredible potential to expand, with opportunities to push into an even broader geographic area. We have put tremendous efforts into our digital product, and now will grow our audience online by building a highly-visible print product as much for aspiring audiences as for seasoned experts.

This is an exciting time in media, and we see a turning point. Platform agnosticism used to be a battle cry. But the reality is that it’s not a platform, it’s the content.

Our audience is involved in these adventures, and in many cases they are in remote locations pursuing their passions. Given that, it makes perfect sense to give our consumers a great experience in digital and print.

HTML5 or Native App: What works best on mobile and tablet devices?

The mobile market has grown rapidly over the past couple of years and with the addition of tablets we will continue to see double-digit growth for quite some time, as reported by eMarketer in a recent report.

With all this growth comes a tremendous challenge. Which mobile platforms should a business pursue to optimize growth of audience and revenue, while keeping in mind associated development costs? Should you develop mobile optimized websites, native apps or most recently web apps?

Along with the mobile evolution comes HTML5.  This evolving web technology is a cornerstone of the growing Web App development effort.  Many publishers like HTML5 because it costs less than developing a native app for each mobile platform/Operating System (i.e., iOS, Android, Blackberry, etc.).  With HTML5 web apps, essentially, you build your app once and it will work across all mobile devices.

So, what is HTML5?

It is important to have a layman’s understanding of what HTML5 is  in order to assess the most optimal utilization.

Wikipedia describes it

“A language for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web, a core technology of the internet and as of August 2011 is still under development.”

The promise of HTML5 is cross platform development.  It is designed to deliver as close a native app experience as possible but deliver it via the open mobile web.  Since it is the web it does not matter what platform you are using. It can be accessed by any device without going through a proprietary app store front operated by a manufacturer or any other third party.  Just for clarity sake, a native app is an application specifically designed to run on a proprietary platform, taking advantage of its native platform functionality. Without the need to be connected to the Internet.  There is much more to it than that but I did say layman’s discussion.

At present, HTML5 has several strong attributes but it doesn’t offer the same functionality – and doesn’t work as seamlessly – as a native app.  For example HTML5 doesn’t allow deeper integration of the device accelerometer, camera, video and GPS capabilities.  Shown below is a table I borrowed from Worklight. It identifies specific features and shows no single approach is capable of delivering all of the benefits all of the time. Choosing the right approach depends on the specific needs of the organization and can be driven by parameters such as budget, timeframe, internal resources, target market, required application functionality, IT infrastructure and many others. Most companies today face an obvious tradeoff between user experience and application functionality on one hand, and development costs and time to market on the other.

It may sound like HTML5 is long on promise but short on actual results, while a native app delivers a better consumer experience but is more costly and takes longer to develop.

The Hybrid Approach

I believe the best way to pursue a mobile strategy in today’s environment is a hybrid approach.  A hybrid approach takes advantage of the best of both HTML5 and native app technologies to deliver apps with the optimum blend of user experience and cost/time to market.  HTML5 based web apps have exciting possibilities and it’s critical for an organization to developing expertise in this new and fast evolving technology.  But because of its current limitations it is too much of a risk to fully embrace.  The consumer experience may suffer and as fast as the market is moving you could cause harm to your business by not looking savvy to your audience and/or advertisers.

So what is a hybrid app model?  It is merging native app capabilities and functionality with an embedded browser inside the app that runs some of the user interface.  This is all transparent to the user.  You can be assured they don’t care how we get it done, they just want a great user experience.  A benefit of a hybrid app is maximum audience reach.  A hybrid app will be accessible via web search, as well as through app store distribution.

Shown below is a graphic that shows the correlation between a great user experience and the cost and time it takes to create an app.

                                                    Credit Worklight

The hybrid approach allows an organization to develop apps that employ native capabilities and functionality and leverage existing resources to minimize development cost development cycle time. So instead of rewriting code for each proprietary platform which is time consuming and costly, you can write some of the app in HTML or JavaScript (web technology jargon), and re-use it across all platforms.  This type of development opens a whole host of opportunities for the app.  You can now have an app load pages from a web site or even have some or the entire user interface in HTML 5.  Since this is a hybrid app it is still native and needs to be downloaded.  The portions of the app requiring an embedded browser will act and feel like a native app but the user will need internet access to make it all work seamlessly.

From a strategic standpoint I am an advocate of the hybrid approach.  It is not suitable for all app development needs but it does provide a cost effective solution for a wide range of apps.

Here is an article on Web vs Native App development you might find interesting reading.

http://www.informationweek.com/news/development/web/231500197