Integrating Products into Video is an Art not a Science or maybe a little bit of Both

 

Our digital marketing agency, Dorado Brand Studio recently completed a major video project with Naked Mobile a division of Cellular One.  We built a weeklong project that encompassed some of the natural beauty of Utah, the great outdoors, camping and of course integrating some great mobile phones into our efforts. The goal of the project was to create compelling content of everything listed above and build the videos to support TV advertising, social media posts and web marketing. The inspiration for this blog post came from several industry people asking me about integrating product without consumers being turned off with the placement. Check out the link at the end to see what the final product of our team’s hard work.

 

To be fair integrating usage of a smartphone into video sounds easy but try and do it in remote regions of Utah, climbing on the side of cliff or flying down a sand dune in an ATV. Ever heard of a cook stove that includes a charger for a smartphone? Well we found one.

 

The planning stage of this shoot was almost as important as the actual shoot. We spent weeks determining the locations for each individual shoot and once we had those locked down we then moved into developing the storyline and built out storyboards, scripts, prop list, and identified required permits for each location we intended to visit. We identified the activities and apps we wanted to highlight set and how to best incorporate smart phones into the video. We were very fortunate to have two people with great chemistry and personalities that made sense for the Naked Mobile “Wanderlove” campaign.

 

Next up came logistics of the travel, props, camping equipment, hours per location and an endless amount of other details.  I’m sure anyone reading this that runs an agency in pursuit of video knows these are basic items that everyone knows but because I speak with many media executives that are new to video it’s important I include some basics.

 

Integrating smart phones into the shoot was something we spent a large portion of our time dedicated to researching how to best utilize the smartphone in these desolate locations. We didn’t want our actors blatantly talking about how great the phone works or look at these beautiful photos. It had to be used spontaneously and in a natural way. For instance we found apps that made sense for the location and the type of activity we were engaged with. One of the apps that we used was able to identify which constellations were in the sky by simply panning your phone over the night sky. . At that same location, we were able to utilize a unique camp stove that generates electricity with heat in which we were able to highlight the phone charging capability while our talent cooks his dinner over the campfire. .  Everything we did with the smartphone felt natural in these outdoor settings and was not forced. We felt it was necessary to not to go overboard with how many times we tried to integrate product into our various 2 minute, 30 second and 10 second videos. We made the videos about the story we were telling and smart phones were a part of the experience.  

 

The completed products we created were well received by Naked Mobile and today are being utilized on TV, social media and anywhere else they can find to run video. Who said a mock gun fight at an old west town had to have guns. Why can’t we have a battle over who can text faster?  Finally it really helps if everyone is having fun and enjoying the time spent capturing wonderful content although they will tell you it was exhausting.

 

Enjoy the video.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nupt2obDfS0

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Are You Part of a Media Company with an Agency or and Agency with a Media Business?

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It seems an article publishes weekly referencing media companies purchasing or building digital agencies in an effort to diversify revenue and expand knowledge base around new technology. Another popular topic these days is about agencies altering their model in order to fit the new model of advertising. A model that includes content marketing and usage of digital tools. 
So, we have media companies trying to act more like an agency and agencies trying to act more like media companies. The reality of this situation is related to primarily designing, creating and selling ads that have impact. Both media companies and advertising agencies want to be experts. Display ads still exist and in some cases still work great, but they are only part of a solution. In today’s ever changing advertising industry it’s critical that an advertiser feel they are getting an all encompassing solution that recognizes the need for a great ad that can reach an audience through search engine tactics, social media, content marketing, blog posts, programmatic, email blasts and a combination of other digital strategies. 

I mentioned a need for a great ad but what is a great ad? Creatively speaking it has to be compelling, eye catching and quickly convey the desired message. Now the hard part. Is it through video, photography, illustrations, blog posts, content written for a specific audience, social media, etc.?  The answer is all of these outlets plus more. More. More. More. But how can a media company or an agency pivot to survive and thrive in this marketing world?

It has to begin with a mindset change. Agencies typically focus on starting with creative design and messaging, then partnering to outsource many of the activities related to distribution of the creative. Some agencies focus on media buying to ensure all bases are covered with distribution sources or aggregation of inventory for distribution. Media companies typically try to remedy the issues with all the new ways to advertise by focusing on, developing or outsourcing a laundry list of products so no matter what an advertiser requests, they have a product to offer.

In order to succeed in today’s market at an agency or media company, the mindset must be to blend. Agencies and media companies have to first start by presenting an advertiser using the worn out term, consultative selling. Agencies can’t just sell the creative and focus on the ads doing all the work and media companies can’t load up the menu with digital products and have sales or marketing representatives choose the right ones for an advertiser. Today requires anyone wanting to help a business navigate the ever changing digital marketing world or marketing in general, the ability to listen to an advertiser and conceptualize what needs to happen on social media versus search engines versus content marketing versus websites versus mobile devices and more. It’s really all about the campaign and desired impact. A thought process around the audience and how they consume information and ultimately the assets needed are the key elements long before a discussion of the tactics or products used to facilitate the desired impact.

I know this may sound simplistic, consultative selling versus product selling but there’s a reason media companies are forming or building agencies and agencies are building out content and digital teams. Media companies want to be part of consultative selling which includes the creative elements including video, photography and design. While agencies are looking to be part of the entire campaign including developing content beyond just an ad and recommending distribution using their own resources  It all starts with a marketing representative listening and building a campaign with multiple elements instead of just selling products the agency or media company has to offer.

It’s critical for success of a media company or agency you let the client win with a successful campaign.  Sales incentives for product sales or legacy knowledge should never drive the decision process in getting to a win for the client.

Digital Marketing and the Role of Video

When digital marketing agencies first opened their doors for business it was all about banner ads, clickable creative, social media, SEO, blogs and newsletters. In the past year or so the digital marketing requests started coming in for content marketing or sponsored content. Fast forward to today, and it seems like everyone still wants the digital marketing efforts already mentioned but almost all conversations now begin with a discussion on video. Many marketers have a difficult time integrating video due to lack of knowledge in creation of video, a lack of understanding in the cost of video by agency and client, developing in-house talent and cost of equipment. Here are some tips for determining if you or your agency is ready to tackle video as part of your agency’s offerings.

Determine business case for pursuing video.

Why do you want to get into video? Are your clients requesting video and if so what percentage? Do you have the resources to pursue i.e. equipment, capital? Do you have any employees who have expertise with video production – videographers, editors? Finally do you have creative staff that can envision creative using video? There are certainly many other questions you need to answer but these are the main ones.

Identify team to lead the charge.

With anything new, it requires focus. It is a mistake to assume your creative, production and sales team can just add video as another service to sell. Many of the strategies are similar but having knowledge about the nuances of video is critical. There’s also the tendency for salespeople to hang on to what they have always sold until the bitter end.

Video production requires storyboards and ideas around the creative vision. Decisions have to be made on the use of animations within the video. What about music? Actors? Length? Music rights. How will it be used?

On the operations side of things it is critical to understand where the video is to be placed. If it’s social media, then the video should be 10-15 seconds or less. If the video is for blog posts or newsletters, I would still recommend no more than 2 minutes in length. If using primarily on a homepage of a website it can be longer but still less than 3 minutes and likely no audio. You also need to understand if different file versions will be needed based on platform you plan to run the video on or the players used to host the video.

Sales should also understand that typical pricing for other digital marketing efforts doesn’t work for video. The cost to produce a video is much more than other products in the digital marketing suite. I would also suggest that sales focus on getting someone with expertise involved in discussing video with the client or prospect. Having a creative team member who understands the complexity of shooting video should also be involved.

What does success look like.

The end product has to be a video that can be utilized in all aspects of digital marketing while also achieving a client’s goal. It should not be a one trick pony. The video needs to morph into each digital effort. It needs to work within a banner ad, on the advertiser’s website, on social media, in a blog, in an email campaign and blends in with photography, text and other aspects of any campaign. Success for the video starts with placement in the campaign, but the ultimate success is more user engagement, more product sales and a client that is proud of the video.

End Result.

Since video has become almost a “must offer” for digital marketing efforts it is critical your company spend the time and effort to develop an expertise. The backup if you don’t have the resources would be to hire freelance help until such time you build up your client base to afford in-house expertise.

While the tips above are general in scope they represent the basics to a successful effort with video. This video for Naked Mobile is an example of the video work we are proud of. Naked Mobile.

An Unlikely Trail From Digital to Print

As today’s media landscape continues to evolve, media groups must remain ambitious. As CEO of Ballantine Communications, Inc., nestled in the outdoor mecca of Durango, Colorado, my team and I found a media void in a place where you would expect it to be thriving, so we decided to act.

The annual booming $646 billion outdoor industry continues to grow and its audience is eager to learn, and even more eager to travel for their recreation. Market studies detail that for every dollar spent on outdoor equipment, four more are spent on travel and related needs. It is a broad group, male and female, ages 20-50 and beyond with a variety of interests. And we know how to reach them.

Today, BCI is aiming to be a basecamp for major online and regional outdoor media projects. Our Adventure Pro brand, an online website and now a print magazine, begins with the greater Southwest itself, a landscape of mountains and deserts, canyons and plateaus filled with renowned athletes and everyday explorers alike. With Adventure Pro, we embrace the huge world of outdoor recreation in a voice that aims to inspire our audience.

Our flagship website also aims to set itself apart with a vast amount of video-driven content. AdventurePro.us is composed of feature stories, tips and educational segments on equipment, how-tos, as well as travel pieces including après activity. We introduce something, whether sport or place, and dive right into where to get started.

Our newest entry in support of digital content is Adventure Pro Magazine, which will not only be an extension of the website experience, but will also stand alone as an engaging outdoor periodical. It will serve to redirect readers to the website so they can continue their experience. For every feature in the magazine, there is an elaboration of that content online.

Widely distributed, 20,000 copies will hit Northern New Mexico, Southeastern Utah and all along Colorado’s Western Slope. The quarterly magazine will celebrate each season and its unique recreational opportunities. Our carriers will stock strategic and highly visible places – restaurants, shops, cafes and hotels – in destinations synonymous with adventure: Moab, Utah; Taos, New Mexico; Pagosa Springs, Durango, Telluride and Grand Junction, Colorado.

At BCI, a content and video production team, a sales and marketing team and development team all work together to produce and promote Adventure Pro. For the esoteric realm of outdoor adventure, we’ve recognized a crucial need for a high level of expertise and an alternative skillset, so we built a staff accordingly to reflect the assorted audience we attract.

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Editor Brandon Mathis comes with 25 years of extensive outdoor experience and training, and a history in news media and storytelling. Mathis has a keen understanding of the culture and is himself a prime example of our audience.

Today’s outdoor enthusiast isn’t just a hiker or just a skier. They are hikers aspiring to ski and trail runners aspiring to mountain bike. They love to research online and educate themselves, from the latest performance wear to the best place for a breakfast on their weekend getaway. They want a little of everything. To them it’s all a lifestyle, not a weekend hobby.

The audience we are pursuing understands the sports we cover but wants to feel they are learning more than the basics. Our goal is to give novices enough information to make decisions about pursuit, and intermediate to experts those tips and information to help them better enjoy their adventure. This content is driven to deliver to people who want the most out of their passion.

We are also partnering with core outdoor businesses that share and reflect our brand’s values. Our supporters are niche retailers, gear supply shops, trending dining and social establishments, craft breweries and professional guide services. In addition to traditional advertising, we offer product placement, native content and digital and print packages, expanding our supporters’ marketing strategies.

The advertisers have also helped in driving our decision to add a print component to our offerings. In discussions with the different advertisers, they pushed the case that print still had a place in the mix due to the various locations many of the audience would consume content. Coffee shops, brewpubs and remote locations all still had strong print consumers not to mention a limitation with internet access in many locations. Thus they believed print and digital working in concert continues to make sense.

Our online presence is evergreen, immediately available and device-responsive as AdventurePro.us updates several times every week with new content. Our social media outlets, like Facebook and Instagram, have a growing audience, and we are developing new ways to engage them, even repurposing viewer-submitted social media content onto the print platform, making our own audience part of the content itself.

There is incredible potential to expand, with opportunities to push into an even broader geographic area. We have put tremendous efforts into our digital product, and now will grow our audience online by building a highly-visible print product as much for aspiring audiences as for seasoned experts.

This is an exciting time in media, and we see a turning point. Platform agnosticism used to be a battle cry. But the reality is that it’s not a platform, it’s the content.

Our audience is involved in these adventures, and in many cases they are in remote locations pursuing their passions. Given that, it makes perfect sense to give our consumers a great experience in digital and print.

Pursuing Online Video Strategy (TV model vs Category model)

We have been experimenting with video content for the past 2 years and it seems like we are finding new ways to achieve audience growth.  Content is typically “king” but success also comes down to how easy it is to find content on the web. In that regard, the importance of tagging was far greater than we ever anticipated.

Recently one of our video websites, 4flagtv.com, changed it’s approach to video. Originally 4flagtv.com shared content with it’s sister site, 4cornerstv.com, based in Durango, Co. Our hope from a production and business perspective was that sharing video content between the sites would increase our inventory and give our audience more content than one production team could produce.

However, analytics showed us that videos produced in the Durango area scored poorly when compared to the page views and time spent on videos produced in Flagstaff, about Flagstaff. To support this notion we wanted to pull all the non-Flagstaff content off the site and focus on local coverage. As we prototyped what the site would look like we had very few ‘shows’ left on the site. Up to that point our programming was similar to a broadcast model.

The Broadcast model

Originally, there were shows on our Flagstaff site with particular topics and a specific host, and they were published on a regular schedule. But we were hearing from the production team that the broadcast model was actually confining what they would cover because they were always trying to find a story that would fit into the shows’ format. One such example was Escape the Grind, a show about fitness. Our shows were simply too constrictive to allow us to adequately cover topics outside their scope.

In another show, #Flag, we had far fewer parameters on what we were doing. It’s open-ended content allowed us much more free range in coverage, letting us bring together disparate topics in its two-minute-plus running time that was far more of a YouTube model than what we had been doing.

#Flag taught us that it was the content, not the brand (especially at the show level), that was important to the younger readers we wanted to court. These millennials were far more accustomed to the YouTube model of programming, not the broadcast model. And if you’re true to your audience, you need to follow what they’re familiar and comfortable with, not what you want to impose on them. Our audience didn’t care about “shows,” so we needed to move away from slavishly producing them. We also needed to acknowledge that our audience cares about specific content, and they search it out by categories.

 

The Youtube model

We decided to break the broadcast model of branded shows and move to a system that utilizes topics and tags to associate content for the user. It also allows the production team to cover a much broader range of content.

What’s different for our users? Now when they come to the site, instead of seeing videos categorized by show name and episodes, they are greeted with the latest content published in reverse chronological order. Each video has collection of tags connected to it. A user may start with a video on bicycle products, but be exposed to links to other topics such as “industrial design, bicycles, business profile, sports, downtown, Flag and Dapper Dre (a local celebrity).

The idea is to get the user to follow a click trail to videos about their favorite things. To make it easier for them, we went back through over 2,000 videos and retagged them with additional information. Navigationally, our site is now structured to make it easy to find content based on categories of content, trending content and newest releases.

We spent much time and energy promoting our show names and branded websites when in reality our viewers only really cared about content categories and the pure entertainment value we could offer. Our road map now follows a major and important detour that emphasizes tags over titles.

Below are 3 examples of our current format.

 

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Campaign Is A Success According to Agency “Not so Much”

Case Study using Adsperity software to monitor ad campaign

Background

A campaign was created for a software company to drive awareness and sign up for demonstrations of the company’s software product. The Adsperity product was used to track results of the campaign and then compare to the agency responsible for placing the campaign. The campaign was flighted across desktop and mobile for the purpose of promoting the software product and ultimately signing users to license the software. This campaign was a way to gain awareness and provide potential clients the ability to engage with the software product team through the website.

Flow

A word on success: Ad campaigns can and often reveal several success points. In the case of this software product, one of the key goals was set to get people to fill out a form to sign up for demonstration of software. This particular element relates to customer acquisition while other parts of the campaign relate to awareness. To understand the success of this campaign it is important to distinguish between the two. The definition of conversion and success in this instance is that users will use the form on the website and “request a demo”. While that is not explicitly acquisition it is the step towards acquisition. Moreover, an argument can be made that a potential user may spend some time on the website to gain information and over time will convert to a paying user.

Also, it is noteworthy to discuss pacing. By definition, pacing is the speed at which purchased ads are delivered based on month/day/hour. Although you can find numerous articles written on the skill sets of ad ops and their pacing practices, suffice it to say that more modern ad servers use algorithms to help with this. And even if the particular ad server cannot accomplish this, it’s a fairly simple task. Understanding your product and market render pacing what I call a “so what” checkbox.

For example, most everyone can figure out that the software company ads should not be shown to extreme North America computers at 3am. While you can argue that living in the tundra one may need our product, it is unlikely. Therefore the focus should have been on large metropolitan areas during business hours. And a targeting focus to sites that will engage highly potential users.

DoubleClick for example runs a very extensive algorithm to help ads ops make those decisions on the fly and can change them automatically.

Campaign Solution

It is important to start with understanding of the pricing and impression model of the campaign. First, the campaign had a budget spend of $25,199 to deliver a total of 5,472,426 impressions over the course of 3 months.

Impressions_vs_Actual

Pacing total is 85% (in this statistic pacing is percentage of planned vs. actual not the speed at which the ads are delivered unless you divide by the number of days during the campaign and derive the number of ads delivered per day.)

Top 10

Retargeting

MNI Performance

Targeting Channels and impressions: There were 5 channels that were targeted during this campaign. Of them, the DataPoint Display Audience received the most impressions.

MNI

The targeting and impressions are somewhat aligned with the goals at first blush. The list of targeted sites can be seen in the same vein as a target audience. The initial launch of the campaign sees that ads being run to a list of websites on desktop are correctly identified. The pacing and impressions within the campaign can be seen as being as aligned with software company goals. However, Adsperity’s SmartVision tells a different story.

Results

SmartVision- The results from Adsperity’s Smartvision conclude that the overall engagement of the campaign was very low. While users did go to the website. The amount of time spent on the website was low. The graph below shows that the most time spent was on the index page and the about page.

 

Blog pic case study

TTR and TSR: The time to read the ad ranged from 1 to 1.5 seconds and the time users actually spent reading the ad range, on average, from 0.2 seconds to 1 second. Within the algorithm this statistic indicates the accidental clicks were the majority of clicks. Those that were not in the majority indicate that most of the clicks occurred after the ad had been on the page for more than a minute. Combining these statistics gives us the performance rating, which was very low.

If we combine that with the time on the website we can see that engagement was mostly accidental. Furthermore, those who did get to the website never filled out a form. Just over 6300 pages views during the campaign at 2 filled out the form. Less than 2% clicked through to the website and virtually 0% filled out the form. This data excludes bounce rate, which can be also derived from the SmartVision’s low performance rating.

3 million ad units served, 6300 page views and 2 forms filled out.

During Ad:Tech New York several people indicated that they had seen the software product ad and visited software company booth to check out product which speaks to awareness.

There were two spikes in website and ad activity once at the beginning of the campaign and the second during Ad:Tech New York. Other than those two improvements in activity the ad campaign and website activity stayed at a steady low. As for the ads spiking it is unclear if agency changed the targeting or pacing during this time. With both increasing it is reasonably safe to conclude that there was an increase in engagement to the extent that more visitors were being pushed to the site.

Conclusion

Data points as they relate to success of campaign (ads delivered vs price paid, ads planned vs. actual, CTR) given the data points received from agency, Google Analytics and Smartvision, it is clear that there were some differences in the data. First it was clear through SmartVision that engagement remained low while accidental clicks were the majority. This was different from the “pacing model” that was given by the agency data points. While 2% of the campaign was driven to the website, and it should be noted this is roughly average, the agency data shows a more positive outlook than the SmartVision data. If the only goal was to raise awareness, this still remains the cheapest option to do so. If success also includes CTR and a request for a demo than this may have little impact by comparison to person-to-person contact. While on the subject of CTR, SmartVision concluded that the CTR was mostly false through accidental clicks. But overall the comparison to the agency data, SmartVision was clearly more informative.

Useful data vs. popular data: Most of the data points in the campaign that were provided by the agency were based on Pacing and CTR. While that data is useful to an extent, the reality is that the data is incomplete forcing the data analyst to make “assumptions”. For example the assumption that the ads drove 2% of the views to the website, therefore there was engagement (albeit very little engagement). While CTR has a place, it was very clear given the fact that most of the time click-through happened within 0.2 seconds of the ad appearing. That was not nearly enough time for the animated ads to compete their animated sequences. These assumptions seem to be everywhere in the data. Even the targeting has an amount of assumptions. Over half of the impressions came from retargeting. Answers.com was the most targeted site during the campaign.

Audience targeting in this campaign may have had some attribution to the poor performance. While one can argue that retargeting allows for more specific audience acquisition, in this case it did not. The list of websites indicates that a few of the sites where the ad ran were outside of purview of Adsperity. In fact, the ads ran on non-English websites. Given that Adsperity is not localized to several languages, this may have had an impact on success. The list of target websites were not what Adsperity would consider viable targets for the campaign. The targeting was somewhat misleading. You can clearly see the areas and target websites (listed above), what is not as clearly evident are the exact pages the ads were shown. SmartVision gave us insight to those pages. For example there are several websites listed but the ads were redirected once they hit the targeted site to “other sites” like wuxiaworld.com, a Chinese martial arts fiction website. Or zehabesha.com, an Ethiopian news site. The overall list may have been on the “approved” list, what is not clear is why the other websites made the list. The retargeting data did not specify where the ads were run for retargeting as opposed to targeted websites. Also, there was no indication of the ad servers and networks that our ads ran through. The data from the agency did not include this information. The ad ops for the Adsperity campaign made no indication of how the targeting was done in the reporting.

Lastly, the data from SmartVision and Google Analytics (website) indicate that while there was an increase in visitors to the website during the campaign the time spent both on ads and website were negligible and lacking engagement. Awareness may have had a boost through Ad:Tech New York. Conversely, the agency data, while focused on CTR and “Conversions” shows that the campaign was minimally successful based on those criteria. If 2% is success.

Overall I was very pleased that the Adsperity product produced analytics that really told a different and more accurate story on the success or lack of success with the software company’s campaign. In today’s digital advertising space it is very difficult to gauge success without utilizing new measurement models and techniques. Agencies need to become more sophisticated in what they report. This particular case study really shows the disconnect between what an agency deems success and what the true reality of the campaign is when measured properly. We have many more exciting aspects being added to the Adsperity product and I look forward to continuing to build new case studies.

 

 

Mobile Ads Are The Future But We Need a Reboot

It’s obvious that mobile advertising can perform much better for media companies than it is now. Publisher Doug Bennett has been working on the problem of maximizing mobile ROI, and he shares some of the evolving functions he has been able to build out in-house that point to incremental improvements.

If Elon Musk built cars the way they’re “supposed” to be built, we wouldn’t have an electric car that goes 0 to 60 in 3.5 seconds. When Steve Jobs decided that portable phones were really computers needing Apple’s attention, it changed our world. The lesson? If you’re willing to rethink everything you know and start from scratch with no sacred cows, you can do great things. That’s exactly where we are in mobile advertising today. We need a do-over with a laser focus on maximizing ROI.

The long-held belief of digital marketing is that display advertising is a powerful and cost-effective tool, while mobile advertising is unpredictable and unreliable. The question is whether or not mobile advertising can do better. It can.

Mobile devices are an incredible enabler for consumers and businesses, but they have been hamstrung by an ad model based on desktop ad thinking (which itself is based on traditional print ad thinking). When you combine this with the constant influx of new devices, features and software and then add ever-evolving user behavior and mindsets, you have massive missed potential and an ROI nightmare.

So what do we do? Do we throw out everything that’s known about mobile advertising and start from scratch? We could, but we’d be throwing out massive amounts of priceless data. Instead, let’s reinvent the entire process of mobile advertising. Let’s stop making ads with the hope that they work and maybe give us some useful data. Instead, let’s use pre-analytics (the data we have) to drive creative decisions, and drastically improve our odds for real success. And while we’re at it, let’s make creating ads a lot easier, too. There are many companies pursuing an answer to this problem. Celtra, PaperG, Flite and our own product called Adsperity are among them. All of these products are pursuing strategies that try to make mobile ads work, and we will all likely find success in increments.

Easy Way to Create Mobile Ads

Easy Way to Create Mobile Ads

We wanted to make mobile ads easy to create, publish and track, but we changed our focus to the analytics that tell us what is happening with a mobile ad. As the ad is being designed, the tool we developed automatically codes it in HTML5, CSS3 and Javascript. It also does quality assurance on the ad, confirming that it meets all mobile ad standards like file weight, size specs and more so it’s guaranteed to work on any device, browser and operating system in an easy to understand environment. You no longer need to be a code wonk to use it.

We’ve also tried to take on mobile advertising’s Achilles heel—cookies. First and third party desktop cookies break down for a number of reasons in the mobile space, from incompatibility across devices and operating systems to automatic and frequent browser cache clearing. To solve this problem, we created custom tagging technology. The instant an ad that we’ve created runs, we know the device type, the OS, browser, connectivity, location, time, interaction rate, time spent and more. A custom dashboard helps users dig into this data, parse it any way one wants and get actionable insights one can use to optimize the ad or create new ones from scratch.

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Adsperity Measures ROI Effectiveness of Mobile Ad


The world of mobile is always evolving: new devices, new capabilities, new operating systems, new browsers and whatever else is next. That means we must evolve, too, so we can accomplish the one thing that will never change – our singular goal of maximizing mobile ROI.

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